Wednesday, 22 March 2017

EARTH HOUR 2017






Switch off to join the future

In 2017, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is celebrating 10 years of Earth Hour and 10 years of progress on tackling climate change.

Earth Hour launched in Sydney in 2007, with 2.2 million people and 2,100 businesses participating in the ‘lights off’ event. Just one year later, Earth Hour became a global phenomenon with over 35 countries, and an estimated 50-100 million people participating. 

2017 will mark the 10th anniversary of Earth Hour as a global phenomenon. It is now celebrated in over 172 countries and over 7,000 cities and towns worldwide. The symbolic hour has grown into the world’s largest grassroots movement for the environment, with beyond-the-hour projects and initiatives happening throughout the year.

In Australia, Earth Hour is something that really brings communities together, with 1 in every 4 Australians taking part. In 2016, millions of Australians took part in Earth Hour to show their support for a low pollution, clean energy future.

On Saturday, 25th March, switch off to support progress 
for the next generation. 

Switch off to #JoinTheFuture. 








Sunday, 19 March 2017

LATEST AUSTRALIAN STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT CONCERNS AUSTRALIAN CONSERVATION FOUNDATION



In a recent article in The Sydney Morning Herald[1], Kelly O’Shanassy, CEO of the Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF), commented on the latest national State of the Environment report.

She said  that while there were some positive signs such as improvements to the Murray-Darling Basin through increased environmental flows, the “story is grim”. 

The report points to inadequate funding and a lack of effective national coordinated action which has contributed to the current state of our environment. Federal government spending to protect and restore nature in Australia is at its lowest level in a decade and is expected to decline further.  For every $100 of federal expenditure less than 5 cents reaches conservation programs.

She points out that while government spending on the environment is so small it is “preparing to spend $1 billion of taxpayers’ money to help build Adani’s proposed Carmichael coal mine in Queensland, which, ironically, will be a major source of pollution for decades to come.”

The ACF believes the government needs to increase funding for the environment by at least 400% “if it is to reverse the dramatic decline of Australia’s wildlife, reefs and forests.”

O’Shanassy  points to the economic benefits that a healthy environment brings in sectors such as tourism and agricultural production.

“Nature in Australia is one of the key drawcards for international visitors, worth about $40 billion to the economy based on figures from Ecotourism Australia.”

“Healthy water catchments reduce nutrient loading, salinity and erosion.  Healthy soils increase productivity through better water retention and nutrient cycling.  Increased biodiversity improves native pollinators, which improve yields.  Native species can play a critical role in natural pest control.”

In conclusion O’Shanassy called on political and business leaders to stand up on this issue.




[1] “Neglecting nature is a budget burden”, The Sydney Morning Herald, Wednesday, March 8, 2017.

Wednesday, 15 March 2017

SCREENING OF "THE BENTLEY EFFECT" IN GRAFTON


 THE SCREENING OF THE BENTLEY EFFECT IN GRAFTON ON MARCH 18 & 19 HAS BEEN CANCELLED BECAUSE OF THE WEATHER.
It will be screened at a later date. 



The documentary The Bentley Effect which describes the community fight to stop coal-seam gas and unconventional gas mining in the Northern Rivers of NSW will be screened in Grafton on Saturday 18th (7 pm) and Sunday 19th (2 pm) 


This 90-minute film will be screened at The Pelican on Saturday 18th March at 7:00pm with a matinee on Sunday 19th March at 2:00pm. 
There will be a Q&A session with Brendan Shoebridge, the Producer/Director, following the film..

The Knitting Nannas will be there in full regalia, selling tea, coffee as an anti-CSG fundraiser.

Tickets are: Adults $15;
​C​
oncession and high school students
​​
$12;  Children under 12 - Free.
Tickets available at Buckley's Music Grafton as well as online at
​:​
www.thebentleyeffect.com (click on Screenings).
​  If not sold out, at the door.​


'The Bentley Effect' is a film not to be missed.  It raises the issue of our basic right to clean, unpolluted air, land and water.